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Opinion

The death of George Martin brings back beloved Beatles memories

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March 10, 2016

In a year that has seen the deaths of many musical giants, music fans all over the world are struggling to keep up with the grieving. On Tuesday night, fans were shocked with yet another fallen giant, Beatles producer Sir George Martin. Unlike many of the other musicians who have died this year, Martin did not have the luxury of album covers and posters to promote his name and presence. However, after a tweet from Beatles drummer Ringo Starr, the news of his death spread all over the Internet and social media newsfeeds were littered with memorials and remembrance. Unlike others who worked in the background of music, Martin’s legacy was built by working as close to the music as possible while also staying as far away from the limelight.

Although Martin’s impact on music started way before the 1960’s, his greatest impact began when he gave four kids from Liverpool, England the chance that no one else would. In the early 60’s, rock ‘n’ roll had reached its first moment of uncertainty. With the death of Buddy Holly and Elvis enlisting in the Army, it appeared as though rock ‘n’ roll was on the way out. So when John, Paul, George and Ringo, otherwise known as The Beatles, tried to land a record deal, few would listen. And then there was George Martin. Martin saw potential in the group and enjoyed their tightknit feel. Martin signed the band to EMI records in London and gave them their first shot in a real recording studio. As the old cliché goes, the rest is history. As the band grew in their sound, Martin was right there providing the guidance and musicality that The Beatles needed. With Martin’s hands on approach, he destroyed the accepted role of a music producer at the time and created something entirely different yet entirely needed.

There are several stories one could tell about the musical magic of Martin and his studio trickery, but as a music fan myself, I see something more in the story of Sir George Martin. Martin was a must-have in the music business and without him, the evolution of music would be completely different. Since Martin retried from making music, the industry has missed something that it desperately needs back. The music industry needs people like Martin to take a chance on the untested, mess with the typical formula and move the art of music. Although Martin’s voice in the forefront is silent, his presence is louder than any pop artist out there today. May Martin’s touch on music stand forever.

Matthew Clark is a junior journalism student. Besides being the music director at WRFW and the circulation manager at the Student Voice, Clark has become an accomplished musician, performing with the likes of Chicago and Daughtry. He has also contributed to a few movie soundtracks.