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Senate focuses on future of Cascade

November 29, 2007

During a short Student Senate meeting Tuesday, the reconstruction of Cascade Avenue seemed to be at the front of everyone’s mind.

Monday’s open forum meeting to discuss Cascade gave students an idea of what the close-to-finalized plan for its reconstruction will look like.

The plan will include roundabouts placed at three different intersections, a new median and the elimination of on-street parking. Ideally, the hope is that the roundabouts will slow down the flow of traffic, medians will add decoration and prevent jaywalking by students and the removal of on-street parking will open up space for the possibility of some turn lanes.

With the need for parking always a concern and the plan in its final stages, it’s important for students to get their opinion in now, Legislative Affairs Director Craig Witte said.

“The plan isn’t quite finalized, it’s just sort of in its final planning stages,” Witte said. “But there’s still time for students to give their opinion.”

Although there was a lot of student input during the meeting, it’s important for students to continue giving their responses to the plan, because the students will be heavily influenced by it, Senate President Derek Brandt said.

“I encourage you all to submit feedback,” Brandt said. “This is something that will affect campus for years to come.”

Anyone wanting more information should visit the city’s Cascade reconstruction Web site, http://www.rfcity.org/eng/projects/cascade%20ave/cascadeave.htm. Students wishing to give feedback are urged to call City Hall at (715) 425-0900.

In other Senate news, student association meeting topics have been narrowed down and forwarded through the proper channels to begin addressing them.

Motions were passed by a unanimous voice vote for student representative appointments, as well as to encourage Congressman Ron Kind to support the Higher Education Act, a piece of legislation that makes all federal aid for secondary education possible. Although it’s likely that it will pass its upcoming House vote, it’s still important to take a stand, Witte said.

“I doubt that it wouldn’t pass, but it’s always good to show support,” Witte said.

Due to the upcoming graduation for several senators, three of the at-large senator positions will soon be opening up. Interested students are encouraged to apply, Brandt said.

“Everyone should start telling students they know,” Brandt said. “We’d really like to continue with a full Senate next semester.”